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Quadriplegics Hand Function Restored With Breakthrough Surgery

Posted: May 17th, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: Medicated | Tags: , , , , | Comments Off on Quadriplegics Hand Function Restored With Breakthrough Surgery

Quadriplegics Hand Function Restored With Breakthrough SurgeryFor the first time, surgeons in the United States have used a new type of operation called nerve transfer to restore hand function in a quadriplegic patient.  The paralysed patient suffered an injury to the lowest bone in his neck.

Nerve transfers involve taking nerves with less important roles – or branches of a nerve that perform redundant functions to other nerves – and “transferring” them to restore function in a more crucial nerve that has been severely damaged.

Instead of operating on his spine, doctors at Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis used the upper arm nerves to rewire a fresh connection to the patient’s brain. Before the operation, the patient had use of his elbow and shoulder :: Read the full article »»»»


Nicotinamide Mononucleotide Helps Reverse Diabetes in Female Mice

Posted: October 8th, 2011 | Author: | Filed under: Applied Science, Cankler Science News, Health, Medicated, Michael Courtenay, Science, Science News, Toxically Engineered, Washington University School of Medicine | Tags: , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Nicotinamide Mononucleotide Helps Reverse Diabetes in Female Mice

http://www.cankler.com.au/category/cankler-science-news/health-cankler-science-news/

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have restored normal blood sugar metabolism in diabetic mice using a compound the body makes naturally.

The finding suggests that it may one day be possible for people to take the compound in pill form to treat or even prevent type 2 diabetes. The naturally occurring enzyme, Nicotinamide Mononucleotide  – NMN – plays an important role in how cells use energy.

Researcher Shin-ichiro Imai says this discovery holds promise for people because the mechanisms that NMN influences are largely the same in mice and humans :: Read the full article »»»»