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Australian Researchers Push Magnesium Sulphate as Cerebral Palsy Prevention

Posted: March 25th, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: Cankler Science News, Medicated | Tags: , , , , , | Comments Off on Australian Researchers Push Magnesium Sulphate as Cerebral Palsy Prevention

Australian Researchers Push Magnesium Sulphate as Cerebral Palsy Prevention BabiesThe risk of premature babies developing cerebral palsy is cut by a third if the mother is given magnesium sulphate immediately before birth, new research shows. So far it’s only been proven to work in babies born before 30 weeks, however, advocates of the research are saying that this new approach could prevent up to 150 babies a year from developing the chronic life-long condition.

Doctors are hailing the development as the biggest breakthrough in preventing the debilitating condition in 50 years, despite the fact it is not yet being routinely used in hospitals. The benefits of magnesium sulphate had been observed for a while, but obstetrics Professor Caroline Crowther says it was a large study in Australia and New Zealand in 2003 that gave compelling evidence :: Read the full article »»»»


University of Melbourne: Stem Cell Breakthrough for Parkinson’s Disease

Posted: November 10th, 2011 | Author: | Filed under: Applied Science, Medicated, Science, Science News, University of Melbourne | Tags: , , , , , | Comments Off on University of Melbourne: Stem Cell Breakthrough for Parkinson’s Disease

Australian scientists have developed a new technique using stem cells, in the hope to replace damaged cells in Parkinson’s disease. The technique could be developed for application in other degenerative conditions.

Researchers at the University of Melbourne have made a breakthrough in the use of stem cells to treat Parkinson’s disease.Stem cells can be used to allow the body to produce dopamine, which prevents Parkinson’s.Until now, treatment has been too risky because some of the stem cells can become carcinogenic. Scientists have now found a way to identify and separate the therapeutic cells from the dangerous ones.

“We have made some recent progress in that area by identifying novel molecules on the therapeutic cells that allow us to target them and essentially pull them out and purify them,”  said Dr Lachlan Thompson of the University of Melbourne. “I think that will really potentially be an important breakthrough on the road to clinical translation. Read the full article »»»»