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Australian Researchers Discover 280 New Moon Craters

Posted: June 20th, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: Astronomy, NASA, National Aeronautics Space Administration, SPACE | Tags: , , , , | Comments Off on Australian Researchers Discover 280 New Moon Craters

NASA GRAIL

Australian researchers have discovered 280 new craters on the Moon by combining data about its gravity and surface for the first time. The project, undertaken by a team from Perth’s Curtin University – kicked-off by a Federal Government grant – developed a high-resolution image of the earth’s gravity. Researchers then applied the same technique to the Moon which allowed them to reveal more detailed basins that had never been mapped :: Read the full article »»»»


Two NASA Probes Crash Land on Lunar Surface

Posted: December 19th, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: NASA, National Aeronautics Space Administration, SPACE | Tags: , , , , , | Comments Off on Two NASA Probes Crash Land on Lunar Surface

Cankler - Two NASA Probes Crash Land on Luna Surface

Two tiny NASA probes have crashed into the Moon after spending months gathering data by orbiting kilometres above the lunar surface, the US space agency said. The site where the probes crashed will be named after astronaut Sally Ride, the first US female in space. The two tiny probes have been dubbed Ebb and Flow :: Read the full article »»»»


NASA JPL GRAIL Probes in Orbit to Map Moon Interior

Posted: January 2nd, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: Cankler Science News, NASA | Tags: , , , , , , | Comments Off on NASA JPL GRAIL Probes in Orbit to Map Moon Interior

NASA JPL GRAIL Probes in Orbit to Map Moon InteriorTwo robotic probes have begun orbiting the moon in preparation for an unprecedented mission to map the lunar interior.

NASA’s twin Gravity Recovery And Interior Laboratory, or GRAIL, spacecraft wrapped up a 2.6-million-mile journey to put themselves into lunar orbit on Saturday and Sunday.

Over the next two months, the probes’ 55-kilometre-high orbits will be adjusted to get them into optimal position to measure the pushes and pulls of the moon’s gravity, data that scientists can use to model what is inside the moon. Information on the moon’s interior is a key piece of information still missing despite more than 100 previous missions to the moon, including six human expeditions. Read the full article »»»»