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Scientists Discover New Volcanic Eruption Trigger

Posted: May 20th, 2015 | Author: | Filed under: Applied Science, Geology | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Scientists Discover New Volcanic Eruption Trigger

Scientists Discover New Volcanic Eruption TriggerScientists say they’ve found a new way to predict when a volcano is about to erupt. Simply; after a measurable pressure drop occurs within a volcano’s internal plumbing, an eruption is likely to follow.

This pressure drop can potentially be used by volcanologists to predict a catastrophic eruption. The researchers say the importance is quite significant, particularly if you are part of a community that lives next door to a volcano, or an airline company mapping flight routes.

The study is hoping to engineer early warning systems so that people can be told with a huge degree of confidence when to get out of the way.

Lead author Dr Janine Kavanagh from the University of Liverpool said with more than 600 million people worldwide living near a volcano at risk of eruptive activity, it is more important than ever that triggering mechanisms are made more accurate. This previously unrecognised trigger could also alleviate the “headache” volcanic eruptions cause civil aviation by providing early and accurate warnings to authorities when they should divert aircraft.

“There is also a strong economic incentive to understand the causes of volcanic activity as demonstrated in 2010 by the eruption of Eyjafjallajökull, Iceland, causing air-traffic disruption across Europe for more than a month, and an estimated $A2.5 billion loss in revenue to the airline industry :: Read the full article »»»»


There’s GOLD in Them There Hills, Termite Hills That Is…

Posted: December 19th, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: Entomology, Favorite New Thought, Geology, Outside the Box | Tags: , , , , , , | Comments Off on There’s GOLD in Them There Hills, Termite Hills That Is…

Cankler - Theres GOLD in Them There Hills, Termite Hills That Is - Litchfield NT Magnetic Termite MoundsThose superneat boffins at Australia’s science-factory – The CSIRO –  have found that termite mounds could indicate where gold or other mineral deposits lie beneath the surface.

Researchers believe that even small termite mounds could be reliable markers, and that termites themselves may be a cost-effective and environmentally friendly means of finding new mineral deposits.

Termite mounds are abundant across Australia’s north, and the largest ones can stand up to five metres tall. The research was published in science journals PLoS ONE and Geochemistry: Exploration, Environment, Analysis, found that at a test site in the West Australian goldfields termite mounds contained high concentrations of gold. This gold indicates there is a larger deposit underneath :: Read the full article »»»»


Australian Government Joins US Energy Department in $83m Solar Research Project

Posted: December 13th, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: Science of Green | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Australian Government Joins US Energy Department in $83m Solar Research Project

Australian Government joins US Energy Department in $83m Solar Research Project

The Australian Federal Government has announced an $83 million solar research program in partnership with the United States. The eight-year project will bring together six Australian universities, the CSIRO and the US department of energy.

Its aim is to create new technology that will reduce the cost of solar power. Australia’s Energy Minister Martin Ferguson says it is the biggest solar energy research investment in Australia’s history :: Read the full article »»»»


Southern Ocean Carbon NOT Sinking

Posted: July 30th, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: Cankler Science News, Climate Change | Tags: , , , , , | Comments Off on Southern Ocean Carbon NOT Sinking

CSIRO Dr Richard MatearAustralian and British researchers have found that one of the world’s largest carbon sinks stores carbon differently than first thought. Utilising data collected over ten years from robotic – Argo – probes, the team has shown subduction happens at specific locations as a result of interplay between winds, currents and massive whirlpools.

Dr Matear says the study also shows the Southern Ocean is not as efficient as first thought in capturing anthropogenic carbon dioxide. The Southern Ocean contains about 40 per cent of all carbon dioxide emissions absorbed by the world’s oceans.

Researchers from the CSIRO and British Antarctic Survey examined the way the Southern Ocean sucks carbon absorbed from the surface layer into the deeper ocean.

Research co-author Dr Richard Matear from the CSIRO says the study shows the method through which carbon is drawn down from the surface of the Southern Ocean to the ocean’s interior – or deep waters :: Read the full article »»»»


Our Planet’s Water Cycle is Intensifying With Global Warming

Posted: April 28th, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: Cankler Science News, Climate Change, Ecology, Science of Green | Tags: , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Our Planet’s Water Cycle is Intensifying With Global Warming

Our Planet's Water Cycle is Intensifying With Global WarmingA study published in the journal Science has concluded that climate change is altering oceans and rainfall worldwide. A team of three researchers looked at ocean data over the period 1950 to 2000. The research found salinity levels have changed in all the world’s oceans, wetter areas are experiencing more rain and drier areas have become drier.

Susan Wijffels from the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation – CSIRO – says she expects the trend to continue.

“The answer of how much more is going to be in the future depends on how much more warning there is going to be,” she said. “So if we stay on a high emissions pathway we might see warming up around three degrees, which will give us maybe a 24 per cent change in our water cycle.”

The authors say this could have implications for global food security. In the paper, Australian scientists from the CSIRO and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, California, reported changing patterns of salinity in the global ocean during the past 50 years, marking a clear fingerprint of climate change. :: Read the full article »»»»