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Autism Testing Failing to Detect Condition in Females

Posted: August 12th, 2014 | Author: | Filed under: Applied Science, Cankler Science News, Health, Medicated | Tags: , , | Comments Off on Autism Testing Failing to Detect Condition in Females

Autism Testing Failing to Detect Condition in FemalesAutism experts are calling for changes in diagnostic testing, saying the current approach is failing to identify the true number of females with the disorder.

They say a massive imbalance in the number of autism diagnoses between the sexes could be attributed to more subtle symptoms in females that are either dismissed by clinicians, or undetected by current testing, which focuses on signs associated with male behaviour.

The challenge in diagnosing girls with autism is a focus of Dr Ernsperger, who is speaking at a conference in Melbourne.

She believes the diagnostic questionnaires doctors use for autism focus mainly on the male characteristics of the disorder and are yet to be adapted for girls :: Read the full article »»»»


New Research Predicts Autism Much Earlier

Posted: January 29th, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: Cankler Science News | Tags: , , , , | Comments Off on New Research Predicts Autism Much Earlier

New Research Predict Autism EarlierAutism, a disorder of neural development characterized by impaired social interaction, restricted and repetitive behavior. The signs of Autism all begin before a child is three years old. Autism affects information processing in the brain by altering how nerve cells and their synapses connect and organize; how this occurs is not yet well understood.

Signs of ASD are diagnosed in the first three years of a child’s life, generally between the second and third year, the signs develop gradually, in some cases however, autistic children first develop more normally, and then regress.

New research has shown that children who develop autism may show signs of different brain responses in their first year of life, researchers say the study may in the future help doctors diagnose the disorder much earlier :: Read the full article »»»»