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Branson Opens Spaceport America

Posted: October 18th, 2011 | Author: | Filed under: Blip, Cankler, Engineered Life, Favorite New Thought, M.Aaron Silverman, NASA, Outside the Box, Science News | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Branson Opens Spaceport America

Our favorite  billionaire, Richard Branson has opened the world’s first commercial spaceport in the New Mexico desert, the new home for his company Virgin Galactic

Branson inaugurated the building by breaking a champagne bottle against the building, while rappelling down the side of it, hung 20 meters above the ground from the main terminal roof. Described by it’s builder as, the next chapter in space transportation. “Forward-thinking pioneers are developing both vertical and horizontal launch vehicles using the power of free-market enterprise.  As the world’s first purpose-built commercial spaceport, Spaceport America is designed with the needs of the commercial space business in mind. Unique geographic benefits, striking iconic design, and the tradition of New Mexico space leadership are coming together to create a new way to travel into space. When it comes to outer space, New Mexico is bringing it down to earth!” Read the full article »»»»


An Unimaginably Beautiful Life: Optimism and the Private Memory

Posted: October 10th, 2011 | Author: | Filed under: Applied Science, Chemically Engineered, Favorite New Thought, M.Aaron Silverman, Medicated, Science, Science News, Toxically Engineered, University College London | Tags: , , , , , , | Comments Off on An Unimaginably Beautiful Life: Optimism and the Private Memory

In two or three hundred years life on earth will be unimaginably beautiful, astounding. Man needs such a life and if it hasn’t yet appeared, he should begin to anticipate it, wait for it, dream about it, prepare for it.

Anton Pavlovich Chekhov

In a study, published in Current Biology, researchers have confirmed an important role for dopamine in how human expectations are formed and how people make complex decisions. It also contributes to an understanding of how pleasure expectation can go awry. The study has found human beings are hard-wired to be optimistic, even in the face of a darker reality. Scientists led by Dr Tali Sharot at the University College London studied a group of people who were told they were likely to experience something bad. The results found most people stayed highly optimistic. And the researchers say the study shows why people are often foolhardy, naive or overly ambitious. Read the full article »»»»


Humans: Just Fish Out of Water

Posted: October 8th, 2011 | Author: | Filed under: Blip, Engineered Life, M.Aaron Silverman, Monash University, Science, Science News, University of Sydney | Tags: , , , , | Comments Off on Humans: Just Fish Out of Water

A study into the muscle development of several different fish has given insights into the genetic leap that set the scene for the evolution of hind legs in terrestrial animals. This innovation gave rise to the tetrapods — four-legged creatures, and our distant ancestors – that made the first small steps on land some 400 million years ago.

The team of Australian researchers led by Professor Peter Currie, of the Australian Regenerative Medicine Institute at Monash University, and Dr Nicolas Cole, of the University of Sydney, reports that Humans are just modified fish.

“The genome of fish is not vastly different from our own. We have shown that the mechanism of pelvic muscle formation in bony fish is transitional between that in sharks and in our tetrapod ancestors.” said Professor Currie.

Scientists have long known that ancient lungfish species are the ancestors of the tetrapods. These fish could survive on land, breathing air and using their pelvic fins to propel themselves. Australia is home to three species of the few remaining lungfish — two marine species and one inhabiting Queensland’s Mary River basin. Read the full article »»»»


OPERA :: Faster Than The Speed of Light

Posted: September 28th, 2011 | Author: | Filed under: Applied Science, Favorite New Thought, M.Aaron Silverman, Outside the Box, Physics Applied, Quantum Mechanics, Quantum Physics, Quantum Physics, Quantum Physics, Science, Science News | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on OPERA :: Faster Than The Speed of Light

Scientists from the European Organization for Nuclear Research and the Italian National Institute of Nuclear Physics, under the experiment banner of OPERA  are reporting that sub-atomic particles known as neutrinos have the ability to travel faster than the speed of light, a discovery that if verified, would completely disassemble Einstein’s theory of special as well as general relativity. Or, at the outside these findings – if correct – may force science to re-calculate the speed of light :: Read the full article »»»»


UC Berkeley Scientists Use Magnetic Brain Imaging to Reveal the Movies In Our Mind

Posted: September 23rd, 2011 | Author: | Filed under: Applied Science, Cankler, Favorite New Thought, M.Aaron Silverman, Outside the Box, Science, Science News, University of California-Berkeley | Tags: , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on UC Berkeley Scientists Use Magnetic Brain Imaging to Reveal the Movies In Our Mind

Highpants Psychic

Researchers from the University of California-Berkeley have used functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging – fMRI – and computational models to watch clips of movies inside the minds of people who just viewed them . . . researchers were able to decipher and reconstruct movies from peoples minds!

As you move through the world or you watch a movie, a dynamic, ever-changing pattern of activity is evoked in the brain. The goal of movie reconstruction is to use the evoked activity to recreate the movie you observed. To do this, we create encoding models that describe how movies are transformed into brain activity, and now researchers have used those models to decode brain activity and reconstruct the stimulus, they’ve turned our thoughts of moving pictures back into movies . . .

 Human visual encoding is a clever and complex system, it consists of several dozen distinct cortical visual areas and sub-cortical nuclei, all arranged in a network that is both hierarchical and parallel. Visual information comes into the eye and is transduced into nerve impulses, electrified. These impulses are sent on to the lateral geniculate nucleus and then to Primary Visual Cortex :: Read the full article »»»»