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There’s GOLD in Them There Hills, Termite Hills That Is…

Posted: December 19th, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: Entomology, Favorite New Thought, Geology, Outside the Box | Tags: , , , , , , | Comments Off on There’s GOLD in Them There Hills, Termite Hills That Is…

Cankler - Theres GOLD in Them There Hills, Termite Hills That Is - Litchfield NT Magnetic Termite MoundsThose superneat boffins at Australia’s science-factory – The CSIRO –  have found that termite mounds could indicate where gold or other mineral deposits lie beneath the surface.

Researchers believe that even small termite mounds could be reliable markers, and that termites themselves may be a cost-effective and environmentally friendly means of finding new mineral deposits.

Termite mounds are abundant across Australia’s north, and the largest ones can stand up to five metres tall. The research was published in science journals PLoS ONE and Geochemistry: Exploration, Environment, Analysis, found that at a test site in the West Australian goldfields termite mounds contained high concentrations of gold. This gold indicates there is a larger deposit underneath :: Read the full article »»»»


CSIRO Reveals Bootylicious Beyoncé Fly

Posted: January 15th, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: Entomology, Favorite New Thought, From The Web | Tags: , , , | Comments Off on CSIRO Reveals Bootylicious Beyoncé Fly

CSIRO Reveals Bootylicious Beyonce Fly - Click to EnlargeCSIRO researchers have paid a mealymouthed compliment to US pop sensation Beyoncé Knowles – naming a rare horse fly after her in honour of its bootylicious golden behind. The Scaptia (Plinthina) beyonceae fly, which is found in far north Queensland, sports a spectacular gold patch on its abdomen which CSIRO insect expert Bryan Lessard says makes it the “all-time diva of flies”.

“It was the unique dense golden hairs on the fly’s abdomen that led me to name this fly in honour of the performer Beyoncé as well as giving me the chance to demonstrate the fun side of taxonomy – the naming of species,” Mr Lessard said in a statement released on the CSIRO blog.

The rare Scaptia plinthina horse fly was collected in 1981 from the Atherton Tablelands, west of Cairns, in far north Queensland. the fly was discovered in the same year the former Destiny’s Child singer was born. Read the full article »»»»