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Garvin Institute Discover Critical Breast Cancer Protien

Posted: December 29th, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: Applied Science, Cankler Science News, Chemically Engineered, Engineered Life, Health, Medicated | Tags: , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Garvin Institute Discover Critical Breast Cancer Protien

Garvin Institute Discovers Critical Breast Cancer Protien

Australian researchers have discovered a key factor explaining the lack of effectiveness of some breast cancer treatments. Associate Professor Chris Ormandy from Sydney’s Garvan Institute says a protein he has been studying for a decade plays a critical role in the development of breast cancer.

The researchers have shown how a ‘transcription factor’ causes breast cancer to develop an aggressive subtype that lacks sensitivity to oestrogen and does not respond to anti-oestrogen therapies such as Tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitors.

Transcription factors are molecules that switch genes on or off. In this case, the transcription factor known as ‘ELF5’ inhibits sensitivity to oestrogen very early in the life of a breast cancer cell :: Read the full article »»»»


Star Studded Line-up Announces Planetary Resources Asteroid Mining

Posted: April 25th, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: Cankler Science News, Engineered Life | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Star Studded Line-up Announces Planetary Resources Asteroid Mining

Planetary Resources Announces Asteroid MiningWhat do Larry Page, Sergy Brin, Eric Schmidt, Ross Perot, K Ram Shriram, James Cameron, Peter H. Diamandis and Cahrles Simonyi  have in common? Last week one may have surmised ‘Their Pubicist’. The group had the internet all wobbly over rumours that they we’re about to start-up an inter-planetary galactic mining company. The press release – bottom of this page – was all about combining space exploration with resource extraction made it all but obvious that somebody was going to announce some very ambitious plans surrounding asteroid mining. Turns out it’s not a new idea, just a press junket!  Planetary Resources has officially unveiled its plans to mine in space.

Planetary Resources – www.planetaryresources.com –  the 3 year old company whose backers include the above list of luminaries, used the  Museum of Flight  in Seattle, Washington to launch a bold plan to prospect on resource-rich asteroids in space not far from Earth :: Read the full article »»»»


University of Pennsylvania’s GRASP Lab Unleashes Swarm of Nano Quadrotors

Posted: February 12th, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: Applied Science, Engineered Life | Tags: , , , , | Comments Off on University of Pennsylvania’s GRASP Lab Unleashes Swarm of Nano Quadrotors

University of Pennsylvania's GRASP lab unleashes a swarm of Nano QuadrotorsRemote-controlled quadrotor robots have been around for some time, but in the following video just released by a research team at the University of Pennsylvania’s General Robotics, Automation, Sensing and Perception – GRASP – Lab, science fiction edges much closer to science fact as a swarm of the Nano Quadrotors perform some astounding maneuvers.

Admittedly, use of the term “nano” may be stretching things a bit, but even so, the capable little robots provide an interesting glimpse into what the future may hold for surveillance, search and rescue, light construction and warfare.

GRASP robotics researchers Alex Kushleyev, Daniel Mellinger and Vijay Kumar teamed up with developer KMel Robotics to program teams of up to twenty agile-flight-capable quadrotors to fly in various complex formations.

Read the full article »»»»


BAL Turns Seaweed Into Biofuel Using Genetically Engineered Terrestrial E-Coli Microbes

Posted: January 22nd, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: Applied Science, Cankler Science News, Engineered Life | Tags: , , , , , | Comments Off on BAL Turns Seaweed Into Biofuel Using Genetically Engineered Terrestrial E-Coli Microbes

BAL Turns Seaweed Into Biofuel Using Genetically Engineered Terrestrial E-Coli MicrobesResearchers have genetically engineered microbes to process brown seaweed into biofuel. The work by researchers including Dr Yasuo Yoshikuni from Bio-Architecture Lab – BAL –  have partnered with DuPont, the US Department of Energy’s ARPA-E labs, and Norway’s Statoil to develop a chemistry that would unlock the energy in seaweed, creating a fuel that’s cheaper than any alternatives produced to date. In this vision of the not-so-distant future, BAL  foresee large underwater farms as a source of renewable energy.

BAL has built three seaweed farms on the Pacific coast of Chile. The BAL researchers have focused on brown seaweed because of  its high sugar content, which provides a good biomass. What makes brown seaweed a super green energy source? Brown seaweed doesn’t compete with food crops for land or fresh water, making it an übergrün energy source. Yoshikuni says “the seaweed uses a different type of carbohydrate called an alginate which cannot be broken down by the land based E. coli – Escherichia coli – bacteria normally used in industry”.

“This bottleneck means biofuel from seaweed is too expensive to compete with regular petroleum-based fuels,” Dr Yoshikuni said.

To overcome the problem, Dr Yoshikuni and his colleagues examined a marine microbe called Vibrio splendidus, which naturally metabolises and consumes seaweed in the ocean. “We don’t know if we can scale up these microbes so we genetically engineered terrestrial E. coli microbes instead,” Dr Yoshikuni said. Read the full article »»»»


MoS2 Molybdenum Disulphide: The Future is No Longer Silicon Based?

Posted: December 10th, 2011 | Author: | Filed under: Applied Science, Cankler Science News, Engineered Life, Nonotechnology | Tags: , , , , , , , | Comments Off on MoS2 Molybdenum Disulphide: The Future is No Longer Silicon Based?

MoS2 Oil

Researchers have uncovered a material that they say has distinct advantages over traditional silicon and even graphene for use in electronics. Molybdenite, this mineral is abundant in nature and is commonly used as an element in steel alloys or, thanks to its similarity in appearance and feel to graphite, as an additive in lubricant. Incredibly the mineral has never before been studied for use in electronics, which appears to have been an oversight with new research showing that molybdenite is a very effective semiconductor that could enable smaller and more energy efficient transistors, computer chips and solar cells.

Andras Kis, director of Switzerland’s Laboratory of Nanoscale Electronics and Structures, announced last week that the first working molybdenite chip has been successfully tested: “We have built an initial prototype, putting from two to six serial transistors in place, and shown that basic binary logic operations were possible, which proves that we can make a larger chip.” Read the full article »»»»