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Scientists Wake Virus After 30,000 Year Slumber

Posted: March 18th, 2014 | Author: | Filed under: Favorite New Thought, From The Web | Tags: , , , , | Comments Off on Scientists Wake Virus After 30,000 Year Slumber

Scientists Wake Virus After 30,000 Year Slumber: Image via Matthieu LegendreFrench scientists say they have revived a giant but harmless virus that had been locked in the Siberian permafrost for more than 30,000 years.

Wakening the long-dormant virus serves as a warning that unknown pathogens entombed in frozen soil may be roused by global warming, the scientists said.

The virus, Pithovirus sibericum, was found in a 30-metre-deep sample of permanently frozen soil taken from coastal tundra in Chukotka, near the East Siberia Sea, where the average annual temperature is -13.4 degrees Celsius.

The team thawed the virus and watched it replicate in a culture in a petri dish, where it infected a simple single-cell organism called an amoeba.

Radiocarbon dating of the soil sample found that vegetation grew there more than 30,000 years ago, a time when mammoths and Neanderthals walked the Earth, according to a paper published in the US journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences :: Read the full article »»»»


Government Agency Warns Infants Diagnosed with Parechovirus

Posted: November 30th, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: Medicated | Tags: , | Comments Off on Government Agency Warns Infants Diagnosed with Parechovirus

Infants Diagnosed with ParechovirusAustralian GPs are being urged to be on the look out for a new virus, called Parechovirus – HPeV – that affects infants and has not been seen in Australia before.

About 20 babies have been diagnosed with the gastro and respiratory virus, which usually only causes fever, rash and diarrhoea but in severe cases can develop into hepatitis or encephalitis.

New South Wales Health – NSWH – says all 20 cases of HPeV have so far been in children aged under 16 weeks.  Parents and doctors should be on the lookout for symptoms.

HPeV is a ubiquitous virus that is transmitted from person to person via direct and indirect routes. It is the cause of paralytic poliomyelitis, a disease that has been eradicated from most western nations :: Read the full article »»»»


Australian Health Authorities on the Lookout for SARS Like Virus

Posted: February 16th, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: Medicated | Tags: , , , | Comments Off on Australian Health Authorities on the Lookout for SARS Like Virus

Coronaviris NCoVAustralian authorities are watching a virus, which has killed almost half of the people who have contracted it, as it spreads across the Middle East and Europe. The World Health Organisation first identified novel coronaviris (NCoV) in September, but experts say there is no signs of it in Australia.

The virus is part of the same disease family as Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome – SARS –  A total of 11 people have contracted NCoV in Britain, Germany, Saudi Arabia and Jordon. Five sufferers have died.

Between November 2002 and July 2003, an outbreak of SARS in Hong Kong came close to being classified a pandemic, with 8,273 cases and 775 deaths worldwide – 9.5 per cent fatality – according to the World Health Organization. Within weeks, SARS spread from Hong Kong to infect individuals in 37 countries.

University of Queensland virology professor Paul Young says local health authorities are on alert because there is evidence of person-to-person transmission :: Read the full article »»»»


Chronic Fatigue Virus Dismissed

Posted: December 22nd, 2011 | Author: | Filed under: Cankler Science News, Medicated | Tags: , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Chronic Fatigue Virus Dismissed

Chronic Fatigue Virus XMRV DismissedThe theory that chronic fatigue syndrome is caused by a virus has been killed off. It is just two years since researchers gave hope to sufferers that a cure may be on the horizon. In late December 2011 two of the global giants of science publishing from the United States, Science and Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, withdrew published papers which claimed sufferers carried a virus. Over the past three decades chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), or myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME), has lost the dismissive tag of “yuppie disease” and is no longer thought to be only a psychiatric condition. It may affect 17 million people around the world, but there is no agreed cause or cure. Yet the studies caused blood banks, including the Red Cross, to ban blood donations from people who had suffered CFS. A medical science professor at the University of New South Wales, Andrew Lloyd, says fundamental steps to good science and clinical care were by-passed. He says it is understandable that CFS sufferers jump on any new discovery.

The prominent journal Science has retracted a 2009 report linking a mouse retrovirus to chronic fatigue syndrome after it was disproved by researchers earlier this year. The 2009 study led by Dr Judy Mikovits, the director of the Whittemore Peterson Institute, found that the retrovirus XMRV was frequently present in the blood of chronic fatigue sufferers, without establishing a causal link. The Journal Science said it had “lost confidence in the report and the validity of its conclusions” after multiple laboratories, including those of the original authors, failed to detect the virus in chronic fatigue patients.

The journal said most of the authors had agreed in principle to retract the report but were unable to agree on the precise wording. “It is Science’s opinion that a retraction signed by all the authors is unlikely to be forthcoming. We are therefore editorially retracting the report. “We regret the time and resources devoted to unsuccessful attempts to replicate these results,” it added.The study had been hailed as a breakthrough for the estimated one to four million Americans who suffer from the elusive but debilitating illness, and led to many being treated with antiretroviral drugs used against HIV/AIDS. Read the full article »»»»


Journal Retracts Paper Linking Mouse Virus With Chronic Fatigue

Posted: December 22nd, 2011 | Author: | Filed under: Medicated | Tags: , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Journal Retracts Paper Linking Mouse Virus With Chronic Fatigue

Journal Retracts Paper Linking Mouse Virus With CFSMedPage Today is reporting that a scientific paper that reported a strong association between a mouse retrovirus called XMRV and chronic fatigue syndrome – CFS – has been formally retracted.

Science posted a statement early Thursday from editor-in-chief Bruce Alberts, PhD, indicating that the journal had “lost confidence” in the first article to link XMRV to CFS, published in 2009 by Vincent Lombardi, PhD, and other researchers at the Whittemore Peterson Institute in Reno, Nevada.

“We note that the majority of the authors have agreed in principle to retract the report but they have been unable to agree on the wording of their statement,” Alberts wrote.

“It is Science’s opinion that a retraction signed by all the authors is unlikely to be forthcoming. We are therefore editorially retracting the report. We regret the time and resources that the scientific community has devoted to unsuccessful attempts to replicate these results.”

Alberts had been pressing the authors to retract the paper since May, when Science published an “expression of concern” about the 2009 paper’s validity.

In justifying his decision to retract the paper now without the authors’ full consent, Alberts cited the inability of other laboratories to reproduce the findings. In what was probably the fatal blow to the XMRV-CFS theory, tests on blinded clinical samples sent to nine research groups failed to consistently show the virus in patients’ blood  :: Read the full MedPage article »»»»

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US Researchers Find ANOTHER Mouse Virus Prevalent in Chronic Fatigue Patients

NO LINK Between Mouse Virus and Chronic Fatigue