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Jade Rabbit, China’s Lunar Rover, Declared Dead

Posted: February 13th, 2014 | Author: | Filed under: Science News, Solar Stars, SPACE | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Jade Rabbit, China’s Lunar Rover, Declared Dead

Jade Rabbit, China's Lunar Rover, Declared DeadChina’s troubled Jade Rabbit lunar rover has died on the surface of the moon, in a major setback for Beijing’s ambitious space program.

The country’s first moon rover “could not be restored to full function”, the state-owned China News Service said in a brief report, after the landmark mission ran into mechanical problems last month.

The Jade Rabbit, or Yutu in Chinese, was deployed on the moon’s surface on December 15 and was a huge source of pride in China – only the third country to complete a lunar rover mission after the United States and the former Soviet Union.

The landing was a key step forward in Beijing’s ambitious military-run space program, which include plans for a permanent orbiting station by 2020 and eventually sending a human to the moon.

The rover experienced a “mechanical control abnormality” in late January due to “the complicated lunar surface environment”, according to the official Xinhua news agency, and was unable to function since then ::::
Jade Rabbit, China's Lunar Rover, Declared Dead
Condolences poured in on Weibo, China’s Twitter-like service, where internet users mourned the demise of the rover, China News Service said in its brief report titled: “Loss of lunar rover”.

The Jade Rabbit rover had sent back its first pictures from the moon, and officials lauded the first lunar soft landing in nearly four decades as a step forward for “mankind as a whole”.

“Exploration of outer space is an unremitting pursuit of mankind,” China’s space agency, the State Administration of Science, Technology and Industry for National Defence (SASTIND) said after the rover was deployed on the moon.

The mission reflects “the new glory of China to scale the peaks in world science and technology areas,” it said, adding it was committed to exploring and using space “for peaceful purposes”.

The lunar mission, which came a decade after China first sent an astronaut into space, was seen as a symbol of the country’s rising global stature and technological advancement, as well as the Communist Party’s success in reversing the fortunes of the once-impoverished nation.

Beijing plans to establish a permanent space station by 2020 and eventually send a human to the moon.

The potential to extract the moon’s resources has been touted as a key reason behind Beijing’s space program, with the moon believed to hold uranium, titanium, and other mineral resources, as well as offering the possibility of solar power generation.

RELATED! Jade Rabbit, has ‘Abnormality’ According to State Media

January 25, 2014: China’s first moon rover has experienced a “mechanical control abnormality” according to the country’s state media, in what appears to be a setback for a landmark mission in its ambitious space programme.

The abnormality occurred due to “the complicated lunar surface environment,” the official Xinhua news agency said on Saturday, citing the State Administration of Science, Technology and Industry for National Defence (SASTIND).

Scientists were “organising an overhaul”, Xinhua’s report added, without giving further details. There were no reports of the abnormality on SASTIND’s website.

The Jade Rabbit, or ‘Yutu’ in Chinese, was deployed on the moon’s surface on December 15, several hours after the Chang’e-3 probe landed.

The mission makes China the third country to successfully send a lunar rover to the moon, after the United States and the former Soviet Union.

The rover’s landing was the first of its kind since the former Soviet Union’s mission nearly four decades ago. China aims to create a permanent space station by 2020 and eventually send someone to the Moon.

It has previously sent two probes to orbit the moon, with controllers sending the first of them crashing into the lunar surface at the end of its mission.

China Lands Moon Rover

RELATED! China Lands Moon Rover

December 14, 2013: A space module carrying China’s first lunar rover has landed on the moon, marking a major step for the country’s ambitious space program.

Scientists burst into applause as a computer-generated image representing the spacecraft was seen landing on the moon’s surface via screens at a Beijing control centre, state broadcaster China Central Television (CCTV) showed.

Hours later the rover was deployed, with China’s Aerospace Control Centre saying it had “touched the lunar surface”.

The rover will spend about three months exploring the moon and looking for natural resources.

State television station CCTV tweeted an image that it said showed the rover separating from the landing craft at 4:35am Beijing time.

The Chang’e 3, a probe named after a lunar goddess in Chinese mythology, blasted off on a Long March-3B carrier rocket on December 2.

It is carrying the solar-powered Yutu, or Jade Rabbit rover.

China follows US, Russia in deploying moon rovers

The Chang’e-3 probe touched down on an ancient 400-kilometre wide plain known in Latin as Sinus Iridum, or The Bay of Rainbows.

The landing was previously described as the “most difficult” part of the mission by the Chinese Academy of Sciences in a post on Chang’e 3’s microblogging page on Sina Weibo, a Chinese Twitter equivalent.

The probe used sensors and 3D imaging to identify a flat surface. Thrusters were then deployed 100 metres from the lunar surface to gently guide the craft into position.

China is the third country to carry out a rover mission, following the United States and former Soviet Union, which also made the last soft landing on the moon 37 years ago.

The landing is a major step in an ambitious space program which is seen as a symbol of China’s rising global stature and technological advancement, as well as the Communist Party’s success in reversing the fortunes of the once impoverished nation.

It comes a decade after the country first sent an astronaut into space and ahead of plans to establish a permanent space station by 2020 and eventually send a human to the moon.

China set to launch its next lunar probe in 2017

RELATED! China set to launch its next lunar probe in 2017

Fresh from its first successful moon landing, China is aiming to launch its next unmanned lunar probe in 2017. China’s leaders have set a priority on advancing its space program, with president Xi Jinping calling for the country to establish itself as a space power.

The Chang’e 3 probe, named after a goddess in traditional Chinese mythology, landed on the moon on Saturday, setting down a lunar rover called the Jade Rabbit.

The development of the Chang’e 5 probe, tasked with the moon sampling mission, is well underway and it is expected to be launched around 2017, according to a spokesman for the State Administration of Science, Technology and Industry for National Defence.

“After the success of the Chang’e 3’s mission, the lunar exploration program will enter the third phase, with the main goal being to achieve unmanned automatic collection of samples and returning them (to the earth),” spokesman Wu Zhijian told a news conference.

When asked if China planned to send astronauts to the moon, Mr Wu said China had yet to announce its moon ambitions beyond the sampling mission, but insisted the plans were for peaceful purposes.

“Our country’s lunar exploration program is a technology program for the peaceful uses of outer space, as well as an open program,” Mr Wu said, citing cooperation with Russian and European counterparts and international bodies.

The US Defence Department says China is pursuing activities aimed at preventing its adversaries from using space-based assets during a crisis.

In China’s latest manned space mission in June, three astronauts spent 15 days in orbit and docked with an experimental space laboratory, part of Beijing’s quest to build a working space station by 2020.

@m_dangerfield

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All three initially suffered fever and coughs, but later developed severe pneumonia and problems with breathing. China’s National Health Commission says it has been unable to identify the route of infection to the three victims, but 88 people close to them currently show no signs of the infection.

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Chinese state media has reported that researchers are currently testing their wild theory here on earth, four kinds of vegetables were grown in an Ecological Life Support System, a 300 cubic metre cabin which will allow astronauts to develop their own stocks of air, water and food while on space missions.

The system, which relies on plants and algae, is “expected to be used in extra-terrestrial bases on the Moon or Mars”, Xinhua news agency. Participants in the experiment could “harvest fresh vegetables for meals”, Xinhua quoted Deng Yibing, a researcher at Beijing’s Chinese Astronaut Research and Training Centre, as saying :: Read the full article »»»»

GIFTS.FOR.HER GIFTS.FOR.HIM

source: xinhua
source: afp
source: reuters
source: cctv
image source: reuters/wikipedia/afp


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