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Smoking Offers Protection Against Osteoarthritis

Posted: July 9th, 2011 | Author: | Filed under: Cankler, Cankler Science News, Chemically Engineered, Health, M.Aaron Silverman, Medicated | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Smoking Offers Protection Against Osteoarthritis

In a new study undertaken by the University of Adelaide, researchers have found men who smoke are less likely to need hip and knee replacements as they get older. While smoking is linked to a plethora of serious health problems, the study found long-term male smokers were less vulnerable to osteoarthritis.

Researchers from the University of Adelaide studied the health records of 11,000 men aged between 65 and 83. The researchers found men who had smoked for more than 48 years were 51 per cent less likely to have total joint replacements such as hip or knee than men who had never smoked. Principal investigator Professor Philip Ryan and PhD student George Mnatzaganian said the findings do not endorse smoking as it is linked to a range of serious diseases which cause premature death.

“This study shows that further research is needed to understand why smoking appears to offer protection against osteoarthritis,other studies have drawn links between smoking and increases in cartilage volume, and more work needs to be done in this area.” said Ryan

This is not the only study to demonstrate a link between smoking and decreased risk of osteoarthritis, but it is the first to imply a strong, inverse relationship between how long the patient smoked and the need for arthroplasty. Arthroplasty is among the most common elective surgeries performed in developed countries. According to data from the 2007 National Hospital Discharge Survey an estimated 230,000 Americans had hip replacement surgery and 543,000 received knee replacements, with severe osteoarthritis (OA) cited as the most frequent cause for undergoing the procedure. OA—the most common form of arthritis—causes pain and stiffness in the joints, with studies indicating that older age, female gender, and obesity increase disease risk.

In this current study, George Mnatzaganian, a PhD student from the University of Adelaide in Australia, and colleagues examined the associations of smoking, body mass index (BMI), and physical activity as they relate to risk of joint replacement surgery in men. Clinical data for the 11,388 male study participants, who were part of the Health in Men Study (HIMS), were integrated with hospital morbidity data and mortality records. During the initial health screening (1996-1999), HIMS subjects were surveyed regarding smoking history and physical activity.

“Despite these findings, the fact remains that any possible beneficial effect of smoking on osteoarthritis is far outweighed by other health risks,” Ryan said.

source: American College of Rheumatology
picture via Dan McDermott www.newbloodart.com/

Press Release: American College of Rheumatology

Male Smokers Less Likely to Need Joint Replacement Surgery of Hip or Knee

http://www.rheumatology.org/about/newsroom/2011/2011_01_22.asp

Surprising results from a new study revealed that men who smoke had less risk of undergoing total joint replacement surgery than those who never smoked. Researchers also reported that men who were overweight, or who engaged in vigorous physical activity were more likely to need arthroplasty. Details of this study are now available in Arthritis & Rheumatism, a journal published by Wiley-Blackwell on behalf of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR).

Research has shown that total hip and knee replacements, also known as arthroplasty, are among the most common elective surgeries performed in developed countries. According to data from the 2007 National Hospital Discharge Survey an estimated 230,000 Americans had hip replacement surgery and 543,000 received knee replacements, with severe osteoarthritis (OA) cited as the most frequent cause for undergoing the procedure. OA—the most common form of arthritis—causes pain and stiffness in the joints, with studies indicating that older age, female gender, and obesity increase disease risk.

In the current study, George Mnatzaganian, a PhD student from the University of Adelaide in Australia, and colleagues examined the associations of smoking, body mass index (BMI), and physical activity as they relate to risk of joint replacement surgery in men. Clinical data for the 11,388 male study participants, who were part of the Health in Men Study (HIMS), were integrated with hospital morbidity data and mortality records. During the initial health screening (1996-1999), HIMS subjects were surveyed regarding smoking history and physical activity.

Researchers analyzed clinical data from baseline through March 2007, identifying 857 men who had joint replacement surgery following the screening. Of those having surgery, 59% had total knee replacement and 41% had total hip replacement. Subjects were categorized into three age groups: 65-69 years, 70-74 years, and 75 or more years of age.

Analysis showed that being overweight independently increased total joint replacement risk, while smoking lowered the risk, which was most evident after 23 years of smoking exposure. In fact, men who smoked 48 years or more were up to 51% less likely to undergo total joint replacements than those who never smoked. The team also reported that vigorous exercise increased risk of joint replacement in men in the 70-74 year age group.

“Our study is the first to demonstrate a strong inverse correlation between smoking duration and risk of total joint replacement. The independent inverse associations of smoking with risk of total joint replacement were evident also after adjusting for major confounders and after accounting for the competing mortality risk in this elderly cohort of men,” Mnatzaganian confirmed. “Further investigation is needed to determine how smoking impacts the development of OA.”

Full citation:
“Smoking, Body Weight, Physical Exercise and Risk of Lower Limb Total Joint Replacement in a Population-Based Cohort of Men.” George Mnatzaganian, Philip Ryan, Paul E. Norman, David C. Davidson, Janet E. Hiller. Arthritis & Rheumatism; Published Online: July 8, 2011 (DOI: 10.1002/art.30400).http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/art.30400.

 


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